Tag Archives: suburbia

Tales From Outer Suburbia by Shaun Tan

27 Apr

Tales From Outer Suburbia Cover

Tan’s Tales From Suburbia is sure to heighten children’s imagination and make adults remember what it was like to be a child. This book is a compiling of short stories set in suburbia. Tan captures the essence of surburbia with childlike eyes and in a narrative format using images that call upon the common American landscape.

On rare occasions, some especially insistent piece of writing will escape into a backyard or laneway- Be blown along a roadside embankment and finally come to rest in a shopping center parking lot-as so many things do-It is here that something quite remarkable takes place-

The book’s illustrations portray mundane communities that can be found across the United States; their identical houses, green lawns, alongside car laden highways. What is interesting and noteworthy about this book, is that Tan manages to create whimsical  tales amidst a backdrop that lacks any real luster or uniqueness. This book is sure to entertain any adult or child and will call to mind the wonder of  imagination and the creativity that lies within the human spirit.

Insight:

These short stories are imaginative and whimsical. They remind me of being a child and making fortresses using the dining room table and chairs. Kids live in such a different reality from grown ups. As a grown up now, this book lets me catch a glimpse of of how I use to see the world. You must read this one!

Suggested Library Activity:  

In a school library setting, this book could be used as a segway to an imaginative writing lesson. This book will encourage students to find the extraordinary in the ordinary every day details. Read this story first and then brainstorm creative writing ideas taking ideas from students’ everyday life.

Bibliographic Citation: Shaun, T. (2008). Tales from outer suburbia. New York: Author A. Levine Books.

Additional Book Review:

“Tales From Outer Suburbia” is a collection of illustrated stories about, among other things, a water buffalo who hangs out in a vacant lot and gives directions to local kids; stick figures who get beaten up by neighborhood bullies; a giant du gong that appears on someone’s lawn; and the lonely fate of all the unread poetry that people write — it joins a vast “river of waste that flows out of suburbia.” This last story, by the way, is presented as a flotilla of random scraps that “through a strange force of attraction” come together, the word “naturally” meeting the phrase “many poems are” and then “immediately destroyed…”

Lindgren, H. (2009, November 5). Everyday weirdness. Message posted to http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/08/books/review/Lindgren-t.html

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